C.G. Jung Concepts: The Ego, The Shadow, The Anima/Animus

C.G. Jung Concepts: The Ego, The Shadow, The Anima/Animus

D. Stephenson Bond is a practicing Jungian analyst who has lectured widely on the topics of myth and creativity. He graduated with an M.Div. from Vanderbilt in 1981 and from the C. G. Jung Institute, Boston, in 1997, where he teaches. A native West Virginian, he is the author of four books, including Living Myth: Personal Meaning As a Way of Life (Shambhala, 2001) and The Archetype of Renewal (Inner City, 2003). Fiction is his lifelong passion, with short stories including “The Mountain Song” appearing in The Mountain Review and “An Evening at the Symphony” in Scribner. Healing Lily is his debut novel.

In a recent interview he noted: “I think I was looking for a way to understand the deeper images and experiences of my own life and I didn’t find that until I found Carl Jung,” he said in a recent interview. “I still interpret dreams for a living, in a way, and people remain curious about dreams and the inner life, but all of that seems a long time ago now. Something has changed. I feel it, other people feel it. It’s in the air, as Jung used to say. So you have to write about that now, if you’re an artist feeling your way through the life of our times as well as your own life. The artist voices the changes in the collective unconscious. That’s the Jungian view. And I try to do that, or rather that’s what seems to be happening when I sit down to write whether I want to or not. It appears as something dark, this change of the times, and yet I suppose creative destruction always feels like that. Perhaps it is only the way the night feels to us in some instinctual way, and when the morning finally arrives we re-orient ourselves and start again.”

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